David C Cook COVID-19 Response

High School

Facing the Future

Lesson 10 

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Winter 2020-21

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By: RLD Editorial Team 

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February 07, 2021

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Lesson Focus:

The Book of Revelation shows us what will take place.

Bible Basis:

Revelation 1:10-13, 17-18; 5:1-5, 11-12

Materials Needed:

Step 1:

  • Internet access

Summary & Links:

Students will consider the past, present, and future battles between good and evil as they explore the Book of Revelation.

Memory Verse:

The revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show his servants what must soon take place.
—Revelation 1:1

Echoes Verse
“Worthy is the Lamb, who was slain, to receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength and honor and glory and praise!”
—Revelation 5:12

Step 1:

Students will consider the past, present, and future battles between good and evil as they explore the Book of Revelation.

Materials Needed:

  • Internet access

The future is a topic that we as humans are endlessly curious about.

  • What excites you about the future? What worries you about the future? (Accept all reasonable answers without comment. Students will have hopes and fears that are personal and global.)

Literature is full of ideas about both idyllic and hellish futures. One of the most popular forms of young adult fiction today is the dystopian genre, which depicts a nightmare of a world (even if at first it seems quite peaceful).

  • Do you read or watch dystopian stories? What interests you about them? (Accept all reasonable answers. The idea of a society that operates differently than ours is intriguing as one imagines daily life in that world. The idea of being a hero in a repressive world may appeal to some, especially when the hero seems otherwise ordinary. Students will know some examples from popular books and films such as The Hunger Games or Divergent, where protagonists question the harmful order of life that has been established and attempt to lead others to a better future.)
  • Do you ever see elements from the dystopian world at play in the real world? (Accept all reasonable answers. Students may see warnings about power, homogeny, even technology.)

The truth is that good and evil are always present in the world, even when one of them seems to have a stronger hold. We may live to see interesting technological advances, devastating wars, inspiring heroes, personal tragedy, and success. No matter what lies ahead, here’s what we can be sure of—God, the First and Last, is ever present, and God’s goodness and justice triumph in the end.

Looking for Steps 2, 3 & 4?

You can find Steps 2 and 3 in your teacher’s guide. To purchase a teacher’s guide, please visit: Bible-in-Life or Echoes.

Step 4:

Materials Needed:

  • Index cards (1 per student)
  • Pens/pencils (1 per student)

If your class is meeting online, invite your students to bring a pen/pencil and index card with them to class.

Even though we know that God’s goodness and justice triumph in the end, that doesn’t mean we just sit back to watch and wait. As Christians, it’s our purpose to look for, tell about, and grow God’s kingdom here on earth. Being confident in God’s victory, we should only follow Him more faithfully.

  • Where do you see God’s goodness in the world today? (Accept all reasonable answers. Students may recognize God’s goodness to them in personal ways. Students may find goodness in the examples of others who live selflessly though they are privileged or bravely in the face of hardship. Others may struggle to see God’s goodness.)
  • How can you share goodness with the world this week? (Accept all reasonable answers. A random or specific act of kindness, an encouraging word, an extra measure of patience, or a selfless deed toward friends, family, or strangers are all good examples.)
  • Where do you see God’s justice in the world today? (Accept all reasonable answers. Students may cite examples from the news, from history, or from personal examples. Others may struggle to see true justice.)
  • How can you seek justice in the world this week? (Accept all reasonable answers. This will require looking out for those who are being treated unjustly, and standing up for them. Students may find opportunities to seek justice at school, in the community, or globally. You might encourage students to find justice-oriented organizations to donate to or serve with.)

Hand out index cards and pens/pencils to your students. If your class is meeting online, invite them to have those items ready. Following the discussion, challenge each student to pick one specific thing they can do this week to work for goodness and justice in the world this week. Have those ideas down on their index cards. Then, give them a moment to pray and ask God to strengthen them to bring goodness and justice to His world.

If students have questions about the events in Revelation, direct them to good biblical resources, pastors, and teachers.

Close in prayer.

Spread the word

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