David C Cook COVID-19 Response

High School

God’s Perfect Timing

Lesson 7 

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Fall 2020

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By: RLD Editorial Team 

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October 18, 2020

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Lesson Focus:

Appreciate that there is a time for everything.

Bible Basis:

Ecclesiastes 3:1-14

Materials Needed:

Step 1:

  • Internet access

Summary & Links:

Students will respond to a time-lapse video as they explore the idea that there is a time for everything.

Memory Verse:

There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens.
—Ecclesiastes 3:1

Step 1:

Students will respond to a time-lapse video as they explore the idea that there is a time for everything.

Materials Needed:

  • Internet access
  • Do you feel time moves fast or slow? Why? (Answers will vary.)

Time is one of those complex things that can be hard to grasp since our perspective is often so limited. You might think time moves in slow motion—especially when you are waiting for something specific. But a wider view tells us that time flies by quickly and you wonder where the time went.

Some things seem to take a long time to grow and change, especially when you only see them one day at a time. Plants are an example of this. If you plant a seed, and wait each day for it to grow, it feels like it can take a long time for sprouts to break the soil. When you see the whole process, though, you realize that plants are always growing, even when you can’t see the changes right away. 

Play the following video for your students [2:34; if time is an issue, you can play from 0:00-0:27]:
Growing Plants Time Lapse Compilation – 123 Days Of Growing in 2,5 Minutes

  • At what point of growth do you think the plants changed the most? (Answers will vary.)
  • Why do you think people like to document the development of plants, pets, or children? What does it teach us? (Time moves quickly. We think we will always be at one stage in life, but in a blink of an eye, a new stage has arrived.)
  • If you had a time lapse video of high school so far, what big events would it contain? What about personal changes? (Encourage students to share some of the stages they’ve gone through so far. These might include a summer where they grew several inches, a change in haircut or style, or a difference in interest—such as a band member in uniform who changed to a football player in uniform.)   

The Bible documents God’s wide-angle view of humanity. Each season and stage of life is designed carefully, each part fitting into the sometimes unknowable plan of God. Let’s look at the Book of Ecclesiastes and find out how perfectly all the parts fit together. 

Looking for Steps 2, 3 & 4?

You can find Steps 2 and 3 in your teacher’s guide. To purchase a teacher’s guide, please visit: Bible-in-Life or Echoes.

Step 4:

Materials Needed:

  • Index cards
  • Pens/pencils

You should provide each student with index card and a pen/pencil. If your class is meeting online, have students bring an index card and pen/pencil with them to class. Ask them to divide their card into three columns: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE.

In this step, you will be asking your students to examine their past, present, and future. All three areas will prompt different reflection, but each one leads directly to understanding God’s sovereignty over the seasons of their lives.

The three columns represent the three parts of our lives. All of us feel some anxiety about our PAST, PRESENT, and FUTURE. You will spend a few minutes focusing on each of these three areas, writing down any significant areas where you might feel unsure of God’s control or timing. This is a private reflective exercise, so you won’t need to share anything you write. Be honest with yourself as you write your questions.

This activity works best when students are silent and respectful of others. Allow teens a few minutes for each stage of life before suggesting they move onto the next stage. When they are finished, gather everyone together for some final questions.

  • Out of these three areas—past, present, and future—which one tends to give teens the most anxiety? (Some students might share that the present brings the most pressing challenges, but others might be fearful of the huge unknowns of adulthood or the consequences of a difficult or traumatic past.)
  • What happens when people try to force an event or milestone before the right time? (We might stunt personal growth or rush ahead foolishly into something we’re not ready for. It takes patience to wait for God’s timing.)
  • What can we do to discern a wise pace and rhythm in our lives? (We can reflect on what God has done in the past. We can seek counsel from experienced Christians. We can study the Scripture and see how God’s character is reflected in His actions.)

Encourage your class to spend time this week in prayer and reflection as they seek to offer those three columns to Jesus’ control.

As you close, spend a few moments in corporate prayer as you ask God to help you and your students live out the rhythm of your lives with patient, careful submission.

You should provide each student with index card and a pen/pencil. If your class is meeting online, have students bring an index card and pen/pencil with them to class. Ask them to divide their card into three columns: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE.

In this step, you will be asking your students to examine their past, present, and future. All three areas will prompt different reflection, but each one leads directly to understanding God’s sovereignty over the seasons of their lives.

The three columns represent the three parts of our lives. All of us feel some anxiety about our PAST, PRESENT, and FUTURE. You will spend a few minutes focusing on each of these three areas, writing down any significant areas where you might feel unsure of God’s control or timing. This is a private reflective exercise, so you won’t need to share anything you write. Be honest with yourself as you write your questions.

This activity works best when students are silent and respectful of others. Allow teens a few minutes for each stage of life before suggesting they move onto the next stage. When they are finished, gather everyone together for some final questions.

  • Out of these three areas—past, present, and future—which one tends to give teens the most anxiety? (Some students might share that the present brings the most pressing challenges, but others might be fearful of the huge unknowns of adulthood or the consequences of a difficult or traumatic past.)
  • What happens when people try to force an event or milestone before the right time? (We might stunt personal growth or rush ahead foolishly into something we’re not ready for. It takes patience to wait for God’s timing.)
  • What can we do to discern a wise pace and rhythm in our lives? (We can reflect on what God has done in the past. We can seek counsel from experienced Christians. We can study the Scripture and see how God’s character is reflected in His actions.)

Encourage your class to spend time this week in prayer and reflection as they seek to offer those three columns to Jesus’ control.

As you close, spend a few moments in corporate prayer as you ask God to help you and your students live out the rhythm of your lives with patient, careful submission.

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