David C Cook COVID-19 Response

High School

Tearing Down Walls

Lesson 6 

|

Winter 2020-21

|

By: RLD Editorial Team 

|

January 10, 2021

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Lesson Focus:

Jesus tears down walls between people.

Bible Basis:

Ephesians 2:11-18; 3:1-6; 4:3-6

Materials Needed:

Step 1:

  • Whiteboard and markers
  • Internet access

Summary & Links:

Students discover that by looking at similarities instead of differences, Christians unite as walls come down.

Memory Verse:

Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope when you were called.
—Ephesians 4:3-4

Step 1:

Students discover that by looking at similarities instead of differences, Christians unite as walls come down.

Materials Needed:

  • Whiteboard and markers
  • Internet access

As students enter, have them use markers to write down groups or things that can divide people. For example, cheering for different sports teams, being in cliques or groups at school that don’t typically interact, having different political views, having differing values, etc. If your class is meeting online, you can use a screen-shared document to write students’ ideas.

After students have written down as many things as they can, read them aloud without comment.

It’s easy for things to divide us. As Christians, we need to look for similarities instead of differences in the people we meet and interact with and tear down walls that can be built between people.

In the video clip you are about to see, you will see two groups of people from Rwanda: the Tutsis and the Hutus. Both groups lived in the same country, worked in agriculture, and had some similar Christian beliefs. However, the Tutsis had more economic privilege than the Hutus. This resulted in an extreme conflict between the two groups.

Show the following video clip to your students [3:52]:
What happened in Rwanda’s genocide? – BBC What’s New

  • What caused the two groups to finally stop the genocide and bridge unity? (They didn’t bridge the gap towards unity until the Tutsis defeated the government. Over 800,000 lives were lost in the process.)
  • Why do you think it’s important to talk about this story over twenty-five years later? (Answers will vary. If we don’t actively take a stand for unity, division and hate will continue to happen.)
  • What examples of hatred, rather than unity, can we see in our own culture? (Answers will vary; ask students to be respectful and honoring of others as they share. Answers may include politics, religious division, racial division, gender inequality, etc.)
  • What walls do you think could’ve been broken down to prevent the Rwandan genocide? (Answers will vary—for example, fixing economic inequality, unity between the two groups, etc.)

As Christians, we have the opportunity to take a stand against division by choosing unity. We can seek to relate to others and to show them God’s love, even when they are different from us. Today’s lesson is about tearing down walls between people. This isn’t something that is easy to do on our own. We need help from above. Let’s learn more.

Looking for Steps 2, 3 & 4?

You can find Steps 2 and 3 in your teacher’s guide. To purchase a teacher’s guide, please visit: Bible-in-Life or Echoes.

Step 4:

Materials Needed:

  • Index cards (1 per student)
  • Pens/pencils (1 per student)

If your class is meeting online, invite students to bring an index card and pen/pencil with them to class. If they don’t have these materials at home, they can also use the “notes” section of their devices.

If your class is meeting online, you can transition from Step 3 by inviting students to take a 60-second movement break. They can stand up, dance, do jumping jacks—they can choose. Set a timer and allow students to move before asking them to return to their seats for Step 4.

Today’s memory verse is very practical and full of God’s truth. “Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope when you were called” (Ephesians 4:3-4). Some examples of how this verse could be lived out might be: making an effort to reach out to new people, uniting Christians by helping friends resolve conflicts or arguments, being peaceful instead of divisive, realizing that all Christians are one regardless of differences, etc.

As you play the following music video, invite your teens to concentrate on the lyrics being shown on the screen and think as they watch about how their friendships this week might look different if they allow Jesus to help them break down dividing walls. Encourage students to identify people with whom they may have set up walls or grudges against. Hand each student an index card and pen/pencil. If your class is meeting online, invite them to have their index card and pen/pencil ready.

Have students write down at least one way that reconciliation happens (example: trying to put yourself in another person’s shoes, or taking time to identify conflicts that may exist and coming up with ways to mend them). Students may write these ideas down as the music plays.

Show the following music video by Christian artists David & Nicole Binion [5:32]:
Tear down the walls – David & Nicole Binion, REVERE

Walls are meant to be broken! Especially with other Christian believers, we need to seek Jesus’ help in being approachable, open, loving, and caring in the hopes that walls will come crumbling down.

Have each student choose one of the ways they wrote on their cards; challenge them to follow it this week to begin a reconciliation process. But just identifying a wall that exists may be as far as this week takes a student. This isn’t an easy task; be in prayer for students this week and remind students that breaking down a wall may begin with the baby step of simply identifying the problem and resolving to amend it. Relationships take time and effort to grow, but Jesus wants us to find unity and reconciliation with each other. Invite students to make an effort this week to invite Jesus into their relationships in the hopes that these walls can come down.

Close today’s lesson in prayer thanking Jesus for the opportunities He gives us to trust Him in our relationships. Invite fellowship by being available to talk to students who stay behind to learn more about what today’s lesson focus might mean for them.

*Note: Be sure teens understand that in the case of abuse, they do not need to reconcile with the abuser. They can forgive that person without putting themselves in harm’s way.

If your class is meeting online, invite students to bring an index card and pen/pencil with them to class. If they don’t have these materials at home, they can also use the “notes” section of their devices.

If your class is meeting online, you can transition from Step 3 by inviting students to take a 60-second movement break. They can stand up, dance, do jumping jacks—they can choose. Set a timer and allow students to move before asking them to return to their seats for Step 4.

Today’s memory verse is very practical and full of God’s truth. “Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope when you were called” (Ephesians 4:3-4). Some examples of how this verse could be lived out might be: making an effort to reach out to new people, uniting Christians by helping friends resolve conflicts or arguments, being peaceful instead of divisive, realizing that all Christians are one regardless of differences, etc.

As you play the following music video, invite your teens to concentrate on the lyrics being shown on the screen and think as they watch about how their friendships this week might look different if they allow Jesus to help them break down dividing walls. Encourage students to identify people with whom they may have set up walls or grudges against. Hand each student an index card and pen/pencil. If your class is meeting online, invite them to have their index card and pen/pencil ready.

Have students write down at least one way that reconciliation happens (example: trying to put yourself in another person’s shoes, or taking time to identify conflicts that may exist and coming up with ways to mend them). Students may write these ideas down as the music plays.

Show the following music video by Christian artists David & Nicole Binion [5:32]:
Tear down the walls – David & Nicole Binion, REVERE

Walls are meant to be broken! Especially with other Christian believers, we need to seek Jesus’ help in being approachable, open, loving, and caring in the hopes that walls will come crumbling down.

Have each student choose one of the ways they wrote on their cards; challenge them to follow it this week to begin a reconciliation process. But just identifying a wall that exists may be as far as this week takes a student. This isn’t an easy task; be in prayer for students this week and remind students that breaking down a wall may begin with the baby step of simply identifying the problem and resolving to amend it. Relationships take time and effort to grow, but Jesus wants us to find unity and reconciliation with each other. Invite students to make an effort this week to invite Jesus into their relationships in the hopes that these walls can come down.

Close today’s lesson in prayer thanking Jesus for the opportunities He gives us to trust Him in our relationships. Invite fellowship by being available to talk to students who stay behind to learn more about what today’s lesson focus might mean for them.

*Note: Be sure teens understand that in the case of abuse, they do not need to reconcile with the abuser. They can forgive that person without putting themselves in harm’s way.

Spread the word

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share This