David C Cook COVID-19 Response

Middle School

The Wait

Lesson 4 

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Winter 2020-21

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By: RLD Editorial Team 

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December 27, 2020

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Lesson Focus:

Wait for Jesus, live for Jesus.

Bible Basis:

1 Thessalonians 4:14-17; Titus 2:11-14

Materials Needed:

Step 1:

  • Internet access

Summary & Links:

Students will look at trending product hype and immediate gratification in order to better understand how difficult it can be to wait for something we’ve been promised.

Memory Verse:

Live self-controlled, upright and godly lives in this present age, while we wait for the blessed hope—the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ.
—Titus 2:12b-13

Step 1:

Students will look at trending product hype and immediate gratification in order to better understand how difficult it can be to wait for something we’ve been promised.

Materials Needed:

  • Internet access

Begin today’s lesson by discussing with your class the increase of limited-edition products in the modern marketplace.

  • What’s the longest you’ve ever had to wait for something? What was it? Was it worth the wait? (Answers will vary; be prepared to share your own experience if you have one.)

In the last few years, the level of exclusive consumerism in the world has increased rapidly. With clothing brands like Supreme, Anti-Social Social Club, and BAPE purposefully restricting product availability in order to increase hype around its products, fans are more than ever being forced to wait in extremely long lines if they want to wear the latest brands. And fashion isn’t the only industry using this tactic to create buildup.

  • Before COVID-19, people would camp outside stores for days to buy new products such as the latest iPhone. Would you ever camp out in front of a store or wait outside for days just to be the first to own something? Why or why not?
  • What kinds of things would you be willing to wait this long for? What have you waited in line for? (Answers will vary; be prepared to share your own experience if you have one.)

Waiting for something that has been promised is an incredibly difficult thing to do. In fact, for human beings it is one of the things we are worst at. But waiting is exactly what God has called us to do. In today’s lesson, we’ll look at how God has instructed us to remain patient until He returns, and understand what we should be doing in the meantime.

Looking for Steps 2, 3 & 4?

You can find Steps 2 and 3 in your teacher’s guide. To purchase a teacher’s guide, please visit: Bible-in-Life or Echoes.

Step 4:

Materials Needed:

  • Index cards (1 per student)
  • Pens/pencils (1 per student)

If your class is meeting online, invite students to bring index cards and pens/pencils with them to class.

So far, we’ve looked to the Bible to understand that Jesus is calling us to wait for His return, and we began discussing what we should be doing in the meantime. Consider the following analogy:

What if you were an astronaut sent to a foreign planet for a year to conduct research about its potential for hosting human life? Now, let’s say that rather than following your mission objectives to collect soil samples, record atmosphere traits, and map terrain, you just hung out in Rover, listening to music and taking space selfies.

  • How might NASA and even the world respond when you came back empty-handed? (Although they might still be excited at your safe return, they would certainly be frustrated that you didn’t complete the mission.)
  • How does this situation mirror our time on earth?

Although we’re waiting for Christ’s return, there’s still much we need to accomplish here on Earth. Just like astronauts follow their mission objectives to expand the bounds of mankind’s understanding of the universe, we also should outline the details of our mission here on Earth.  

Hand out index cards and pens/pencils. If your class is meeting online, invite them to have their index cards and pens/pencils ready.

Instruct your students to create a mission plan for their lives, in order to give them a map to follow as they go out into the world. Give them time to write a brief mission plan with objectives or steps in accordance with their own goals. (Examples include: spending time reading the Bible, praying, treating others with God’s love, seeking God’s will, etc.). After a few minutes, challenge your students to commit to putting them in practice in the coming week.

Close in prayer, asking God to give us patience as we wait for Him and direction as we pursue His mission directives for our lives.

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